Alec Baldwin bitches about Shia LaBeouf

alec

Alec Baldwin wrote a massive article for New York Magazine, detailing his problems in recent months including accusations of homophobic slurs, being fired from his MSNBC talk show and also financial repercussions. He also used it as a tool to bitch about plenty of people, namely the media for making up stuff about him and the paparazzi for harassing his family, but also certain famous people – including Shia LaBeouf, who has also fallen out of the public’s graces recently.

Shia and Alec were cast in the Broadway production of Orphans alongside Tom Sturridge but Shia was famously fired from the role  and replaced by Ben Foster. Alec has shed some light on what really went down. Here’s an extract from his article:

 

“Getting back onstage seemed like a good idea. I loved Lyle Kessler’s play and was anxious to work with director Dan Sullivan. Then Shia LaBeouf showed up. I’d heard from other people that he was potentially very difficult to work with, but I always ignore that because people say the same thing about me. When he showed up, he seemed like a lot of young actors today—scattered, as he was coming from making six movies in a row or whatever.

There was friction between us from the beginning. LaBeouf seems to carry with him, to put it mildly, a jailhouse mentality wherever he goes. When he came to rehearsal, he was told it was important to memorize his lines. He took that to heart and learned all his lines in advance, even emailing me videos in which he read aloud his lines from the entire play. To prove he had put in the time. (What else do you do in jail?) I, however, do not learn my lines in advance. So he began to sulk because he felt we were slowing him down. You could tell right away he loves to argue. And one day he attacked me in front of everyone. He said, “You’re slowing me down, and you don’t know your lines. And if you don’t say your lines, I’m just going to keep saying my lines.”

We all sat, frozen. I snorted a bit, and, turning to him in front of the whole cast, I asked, “If I don’t say my words fast enough, you’re going to just say your next line?” I said. “You realize the lines are written in a certain order?” He just glared at me.

So I asked the company to break. And I took the stage manager, with Sullivan, to another room, and I said one of us is going to go. I said, “I’ll tell you what, I’ll go.” I said don’t fire the kid, I’ll quit. They said no, no, no, no, and they fired him. And I think he was shocked. He had that card, that card you get when you make films that make a lot of money that gives you a certain kind of entitlement. I think he was surprised that it didn’t work in the theater.”

 

Getting rid of Shia did not help the play and following that incident, the director was no longer friendly with Alec and the play closed early.

Really interesting insight there, although I’m not sure how reliable Alec is as he seems pretty bitter in this article.

To read the full thing, see here.

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